Colombia Cabalgata 3

WARNING! This post is long! It was also my favorite day of the whole trip so I recommend continuing to read, especially if you like foodie pics!! 

The next morning I woke up early (Like 4 am early!) and watched the sun rise over the mountain. The quiet, green landscape filled with light and for about 3 minutes, you felt completely alone in the world.

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Slowly we all started to file out of our rooms and into the shower rooms. By the time the sun was high in the sky, I had discovered the posada’s small ceramic shop. This region of Colombia is famous for its traditional pottery and ceramics, and much of it is made at the inn.

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Processed with VSCOcam with c1 presetThere were little spoons, cream pots, and piggy banks, wind chimes and salt shakers, salsa dishes, shot glasses, and mugs! Everything you could think of for incredibly cheap so I picked up a few trinkets for loved ones and friends.

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After that I sat down for a feast of a breakfast (again): soup, potatoes, hot chocolate, arepa con queso (think of a corn patty filled with cheese), eggs, and fruit. It may have been too much to eat, but it was beautiful! The colors were bright, the food was rich, and there’s something to be said about how simple it was.

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Once again it was time to hit the trail. My grandpa’s friend was quite the cowboy, looking like he was a part of John Wayne’s group.

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Off we road winding up and around the mountain. This was planned to be our longest day of riding (40 kilometers) but the terrain was fairly easy.

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The day was beautiful and sunny, so we pulled over for a drink and to let the horses drink some water.

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After this, I switched horses with my aunt and moved to a gorgeous Andalusian horse named Consentida (an endearing word for Spoiled) who was quite possibly the most comfortable ride in all the land! Her saddle is a special Portuguese saddle and her trot is extremely smooth and easy paced. I loved it after 2 days of bouncing around with Arquetta.

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Shortly after that, we pulled over again for another break. Having ridden all morning long, it was time to break out the wine! Our luggage and food wasn’t too far behind, so we pulled out some Argentine empanadas and crystal glasses for everyone to sip their vino from.

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Talk about style!! My grandpa never fails to make everything an elegant and chic experience!

When we finally moved on, some clouds began to cover over head and my sunburn was relieved once again. We rode for a few more hours until we reached a quiet creek with an open space. Here we parked and began unloading the trucks for lunch.

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Tina prepared the most beautiful and gourmet picnic any of us had every seen! There were baskets of fruit and trays of nuts. Cheeses brought from Spain and France, fresh baked bread (made by my aunt), jamon iberico, pernil (roasted pork), marinated garlic eggplant, sun dried tomatoes, wine and beer, homemade cookies and crackers. The spread was endless and we all feasted until our bellies were full and we were warm from so much wine.

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It was truly beautiful and leave it to Tina to plan the most romantic, well-styled lunch of the entire event!

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The cookies I loved the most because they were made with so much love. My aunt’s farm is as organic-farm to table as possible! The butter used in the shortbread was made from her own cows and the strawberry jam filling was made by her from the berries in her yard. Isn’t my cousin the sweetest thing, helping her fill them?

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As we wrapped up our lunch, we saw the clouds darken and heard thunder roll overhead. We immediately saddled up and headed 2km down the road to our final destination, but not before we were stopped by the most torrential downpour anyone had ever seen.

There was no escaping this rain. It literally filled my boots ankle deep with water and our clothes were entirely soaked through. Somehow, we made it to the last stop, dismounted and piled into a van waiting to take us to the hotel for the last night of our trip.

After showering and warming up, we spent the night drinking wine, chatting, and enjoying a classic Colombian dinner. The town we stayed in was called Lenguazaque, a very small city a few hours from Bogota. The town is rather rural, so dinner consisted of: sobrebarriga (Colombian-style flank steak), gallina (“hen”…not sure what us gringos are eating hear in the states… I always thought “chicken” = “hen” but apparently there is a difference).

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S omething also very common in this region is called “huevera”…  to put it bluntly, it is the uterus of the hen with half produced eggs cooked inside. It sounds horrific, but I like to consider myself a foodie. A culinary adventurer, willing to try anything once. So I that’s what I did.

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I think Tony Bourdain would be proud. It wasn’t that bad. They tasted like hard boiled egg yolks with some weird crispy membrane around them.

I washed it down with a couple more glasses of vino and then hit the sack, exhausted but no longer sore and ready for our final day of the ride.

Stay tuned for the last installment of our cabalgata soon!

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Colombia Cabalgata 3

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